essential oils aromatherapy

10 Essential Oils to Always Have at Home

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We take very serious all our recommendations, that is why we want to share with you what we think is the most required list of essential oils that will help you to get the best of the benefits from the aromatherapy and its receipts.

When compiling our list, we considered some factors as affordability, efficacy, potency, and range of applications. Let check our list:

Aromatherapy

Essential oils often have a much stronger smell than the plants they come from and contain higher levels of active ingredients. This has to do with the amount of plant matter required to make essential oil.

Aromatherapy is a complementary therapy based on holistic principles, using the application of essential oils to improve mental, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. Oils can be applied in a variety of ways apart from massage.

“I believe that for every illness or ailment known to man, that God has a plant out here that will heal it. We just need to keep discovering the properties for natural healing.” Vannoy Gentles Fite, Essential Oils for Healing: Over 400 All-Natural Recipes for Everyday Ailments

1. Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia, aka Lavandula officinalis)

Lavender has been used for medicinal and home care purposes for thousands of years, and is one of the most versatile essential oils you can get. When it comes to therapeutic uses, lavender can be applied topically to alleviate:

  • Skin rashes
  • Acne
  • Insect bites
  • Minor burns

It’s also an effective disinfectant for cuts and scrapes.

A few drops of lavender oil in a bath can help to soothe frayed nerves and help you get a good night’s sleep, and rubbing the oil into your temples and forehead can relieve headaches. Add a drop or two to a paste of baking soda and water for an effective underarm deodorant, and those same few drops can help to alleviate sinus issues and respiratory infections when added to a steam inhale.

In the home, sachets of dried lavender with some extra oils dribbled in can keep moths away (just tuck the sachets into your closet or chest of drawers), and adding a few drops to your laundry’s rinse cycle can eliminate odors from stinky socks and sweaty gym clothes. Add lavender oil to the water you use to wash the floor to freshen up your living space, and a drop or two placed inside fresh toilet paper rolls will release their scent whenever someone tugs a few sheets free.

Essential oils - lavander

2. Tea Tree (Melaleuca alternifolia)

This is one of the most beneficial and useful essential oils to have on hand, and with good cause: it’s often been called “a medicine cabinet in a bottle,” as it can be used to treat almost any common ailment. Although you’d never consume tea tree oil, you can use it topically to treat the following:

  • Athlete’s foot
  • Dermatitis/eczema
  • Acne
  • Cold sores
  • Nail fungus
  • Warts
  • Insect bites

…just to name a few. You can add a few drops of it to unscented shampoo to alleviate dandruff and psoriasis, and a few more drops in that same shampoo will treat head lice as well.

For use around the home, you can add a teaspoon of tea tree oil to the water in a misting bottle to create a disinfectant spray for counter tops, door handles, etc., and a few drops of undiluted oil around your pet’s bed basket will keep fleas at bay.

Tea Tree Essential oil

3. Lemon (Citrus limonum)

This is one of the best essential oils for home use, as it has more applications than most other oils will ever dream of. A few drops of lemon EO added to olive oil makes a gorgeous furniture polish, and we add the EO to dish detergent, homemade laundry soap, floor cleaners, and spray cleaners. You can add a drop or two to a mixture of coarse salt and baking soda and then use that as an antibacterial scour for wooden cutting boards and butcher blocks.

Lemon essential oil also has therapeutic uses:

  • Add a couple of drops to a glass of water and gargle with it to relieve bad breath.
  • A few drops added to shampoo can alleviate dandruff.
  • Lemon oil added to a bath or diffuser can alleviate anxiety.
  • Blended with aloe gel, it acts as an anti-microbial hand sanitizer.

One thing to keep in mind is that lemon essential oil can make your skin photosensitive, so don’t slather it on and then go sunbathing: wait 12 hours before exposing lemon-daubed skin to sunshine.

lemon-essential-oil

4. Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

Most people have probably taken a cup of peppermint tea to alleviate nausea or an upset stomach, but you can also massage your abdomen with a carrier oil that has a few drops of peppermint essential oil added to it to relieve stomach cramps and queasiness.

If you or your pet has a tick under your skin, a drop or two of pure, undiluted peppermint EO will draw the insect out so it can be eliminated. Blended with pine and eucalyptus and added to a carrier oil, peppermint is great for applying to the chest and throat to calm coughing fits and help relieve bronchial congestion, and a drop or two added to cool water can make a great foot soak to soothe tired, overheated feet.

Around the home, you can spray diluted peppermint oil into stinky shoes and boots to eliminate odors, and add a teaspoon of the EO to floor-washing water to add fresh scent, as well as antibacterial properties. Placing a few drops of peppermint oil around cracks in walls will also deter rodents and spiders: they can’t stand the scent of it.

One thing to keep in mind is that lemon essential oil can make your skin photosensitive, so don’t slather it on and then go sunbathing: wait 12 hours before exposing lemon-daubed skin to sunshine.

peppermint-essential-oil

5. Cinnamon oil

Cinnamon oil is sweet and spicy, musky and warm. Cinnamon conjures up a distinct mixture of exotic and cozy familiarity, which makes sense because it’s both a Far East import and a spice drawer mainstay.

In aromatherapy, cinnamon essential oil can be used to help clear up chest colds. Applied topically, it can soothe muscle aches and pains, thanks to its antispasmodic and analgesic properties. It’s also an antiseptic and makes a powerful natural preservative. It is both antibacterial and antimicrobial, as well as being anti-inflammatory, and pain-relieving. Some studies have shown that cinnamon oil contains powerful antioxidants and could potentially be useful in fighting neurological disorders and heart disease.

cinnamon_leaf_essential_oil

6. Clary sage

Clary sage possesses myriad beneficial properties for the skin: It’s antibacterial, astringent, antiseptic, and can help improve circulation. I like the uniquely sweet herbal aroma of clary sage, which helps to cut through some of the more pungent ingredients used in natural skin care, too.

Clary sage is a perennial plant that is native to the northern Mediterranean region and North Africa; its essential oil is derived via the steam distillation of the plant’s flowering tops and leaves. Although the ancient Egyptians used it in medicinal practices, it wasn’t until medieval times that clary sage really took off. During this time, doctors and herbalists used clary sage seeds to help treat vision problems; “clary” is derived from the Latin word for clear, “clarus.” And it was also used to flavor wine (and referred to as “muscatel sage” because of its similarity to German muscat wine). Someone, somewhere, got clever—maybe while drunk off clary sage wine?—and mashed up the two nicknames. Hence: clary sage.

Clary sage has been lauded for its reputed ability to regulate hormones, and its scent is thought to have antidepressant effects. A 2014 study of twenty-two postmenopausal women in their 50s—some of whom were depressed—showed that breathing diffused clary sage helped to alleviate participants’ depression by lowering cortisol levels and improving thyroid hormone levels. And a 2012 study revealed that clary sage—along with lavender and marjoram—makes an effective massage treatment for alleviating menstrual pain and cramping.

clary-sage-essential-oil

7. Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus essential oil is definitely not for the weak. Even if you’ve never smelled it directly, you’ve probably smelled something that contains it—like Vicks VapoRub, maybe? The scent is similar to camphor (another ingredient in VapoRub, and also in Tiger Balm ointment) and slightly minty. It will clear your airways super quick and can take your breath away.

Here’s what else it’s been shown to do: It works as a pesticide and has the ability to kill fungus, bacteria, insects, mites, and weeds—and it has been believed to kill the drug-resistant parasite that causes malaria. (It’s possible this is why eucalyptus trees were first planted in California in the 1850s. They were an invasive species from Australia but the government was worried about the spread of malaria. The trees helped!) It can also help boost your immune system and is anti-inflammatory.

I like to diffuse eucalyptus oil at home. The scent is a little strong, but it really freshens up a room and makes the air feel clean. It also makes a great pantry and closet moth and bug repellent.

Eucalyptus_essential_Oil

8. Rosemary

The scent of the Rosemary oil is a lot like the herb you put in your food. It’s commonly found in skin care, especially natural products, because it not only has topical benefits but also will extend the shelf life of a product exponentially.

Rosemary oil is a stimulant. When inhaled, the aroma of rosemary has been shown to increase heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate and boost your immune system. It has also been shown to increase brain wave activity and aid the part of your nervous system that controls organ function. But while it stimulates many bodily systems, it also decreases levels of the stress hormone cortisol. And it does all of this while airborne, so you can simply diffuse it and gain these health benefits. If you like the scent of eucalyptus, you can combine it with rosemary to make your space smell like a forest.

rosemary-essential-oil

9. Bergamot

Bergamot oil is extracted from the rinds of citrus fruit (Citrus bergamia) that grow on bergamot orange trees. If you’re a fan of Earl Grey tea, you’re already enjoying the distinctive taste of bergamot, which is used to flavor it.

The earliest roots of the bergamot tree can be traced to Southeast Asia. It’s currently grown in many parts of the world, but achieved its prominence and name in the town of Bergamo in southern Italy.

Bergamot essential oil is a cold-pressed essential oil produced by cells inside the rind of a bergamot orange fruit. It is a common flavoring and top note in perfumes. The scent of bergamot essential oil is similar to a sweet light orange peel oil with a floral note.

Bergamot’s distinctive, citrusy scent is used in both men’s and women’s personal care products. It can be found in perfumes, cologne, toiletries, and cosmetics. Edible bergamot oil is used as a food and drink flavoring. It also has medicinal value.

Bergamot essential oil is highly touted for its soothing use as an aromatherapy treatment. Here are a few ways you can keep its scent close:

  • Mix bergamot essential oil with a carrier oil to use as a body lotion or for massage.
  • Add two to five drops of Bergamot essential oil to products such as body wash, shampoo, and facial scrubs.
  • Use it as an ingredient in aromatherapy. For example, bergamot essential oil can be added to scent homemade candles and air fresheners. You can also dab it in vaporizers to distribute its scent in a room or add it to potpourri.
  • Dab it on a bandana or handkerchief for a soothing scent on-the-go.
bergamot essential oil

10. Frankincense

Frankincense essential oil has been used since ancient times for sacred and medicinal purposes.

Frankincense essential oil is also used as an ingredient in perfume, incense, and skin care products.
While preliminary research suggests that frankincense essential oil may offer certain health benefits, there is currently a lack of research testing the health effects of frankincense oil. A component in frankincense, boswellic acid, has been studied for its anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties. Here’s a look at the science.
In addition to elevated spiritual experiences, Frankincense can help you maintain the appearance of radiant skin when applied topically. Its ability to smooth the appearance of healthy skin, when applied topically, explains why this oil is a key ingredient in our Boswellia Wrinkle Cream™.
frankincense-essential-oil

source: www.wellandgood.com


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